Particle trapping and conveying using an optical Archimedes’ screw

Author(s):

Barak Hadad and Sahar Froim and Harel Nagar and Tamir Admon and Yaniv Eliezer and Yael Roichman and Alon Bahabad

Abstract:

“Trapping and manipulation of particles using laser beams has become an important tool in diverse fields of research. In recent years, particular interest has been devoted to the problem of conveying optically trapped particles over extended distances either downstream or upstream of the direction of photon momentum flow. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate an optical analog of the famous Archimedes’ screw where the rotation of a helical-intensity beam is transferred to the axial motion of optically trapped micrometer-scale, airborne, carbon-based particles. With this optical screw, particles were easily conveyed with controlled velocity and direction, upstream or downstream of the optical flow, over a distance of half a centimeter. Our results offer a very simple optical conveyor that could be adapted to a wide range of optical trapping scenarios.”

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Publication: Optica

Issue/Year/DOI: Optica Vol. 5, Issue 5, pp. 551-556 (2018)

DOI: 10.1364/OPTICA.5.000551

 

Investigation of albumin-derived perfluorocarbon-based capsules by holographic optical trapping

Author(s):

Jannis Köhler and Jegor Ruschke and Katja Bettina Ferenz and Cemal Esen and Michael Kirsch and Andreas Ostendorf

Abstract:

“Albumin-derived perfluorocarbon-based capsules are promising as artificial oxygen carriers with high solubility. However, these capsules have to be studied further to allow initial human clinical tests. The aim of this paper is to provide and characterize a holographic optical tweezer to enable contactless trapping and moving of individual capsules in an environment that mimics physiological (in vivo) conditions most effectively in order to learn more about the artificial oxygen carrier behavior in blood plasma without recourse to animal experiments. Therefore, the motion behavior of capsules in a ring shaped or vortex beam is analyzed and optimized on account of determination of the optical forces in radial and axial direction. In addition, due to the customization and generation of dynamic phase holograms, the optical tweezer is used for first investigations on the aggregation behavior of the capsules and a statistical evaluation of the bonding in dependency of different capsule sizes is performed. The results show that the optical tweezer is sufficient for studying individual perfluorocarbon-based capsules and provide information about the interaction of these capsules for future use as artificial oxygen carriers.”

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Publication: Biomed. Opt. Express

Issue/Year/DOI: Biomedical Optics Express Vol. 9,Issue 2, pp. 743-754(2018)

DOI: 10.1364/BOE.9.000743

 

In situ single-atom array synthesis using dynamic holographic optical tweezers.

Author(s):

Kim, Hyosub and Lee, Woojun and Lee, Han-gyeol and Jo, Hanlae and Song, Yunheung and Ahn, Jaewook

Abstract:

“Establishing a reliable method to form scalable neutral-atom platforms is an essential cornerstone for quantum computation, quantum simulation and quantum many-body physics. Here we demonstrate a real-time transport of single atoms using holographic microtraps controlled by a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator. For this, an analytical design approach to flicker-free microtrap movement is devised and cold rubidium atoms are simultaneously rearranged with 2N motional degrees of freedom, representing unprecedented space controllability. We also accomplish an in situ feedback control for single-atom rearrangements with the high success rate of 99% for up to 10?µm translation. We hope this proof-of-principle demonstration of high-fidelity atom-array preparations will be useful for deterministic loading of N single atoms, especially on arbitrary lattice locations, and also for real-time qubit shuttling in high-dimensional quantum computing architectures.”

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Publication: Nature Communications

Issue/Year/DOI: Nature Communications volume 7, Article number: 13317 (2016)
DOI: 10.1038/ncomms13317