Holographic near-eye display with continuously expanded eyebox using two-dimensional replication and angular spectrum wrapping

Author(s):

Myeong-Ho Choi, Yeon-Gyeong Ju and Jae-Hyeung Park

Abstract:

“Holographic near-eye displays present true three-dimensional images with full
monocular depth cues. In this paper, we propose a technique to expand the eyebox of the
holographic near-eye displays. The base eyebox of the holographic near-eye displays is determined
by the space bandwidth product of a spatial light modulator. The proposed technique replicates
and stitches the base eyebox by the combined use of a holographic optical element and high order
diffractions of the spatial light modulator, achieving horizontally and vertically expanded eyebox.
An angular spectrum wrapping technique is also applied to alleviate image distortions observed
at the boundaries between the replicated base eyeboxes.”

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Publication: Optics Express
Issue/Year: Vol. 28, Issue 1, pp. 533-547
DOI: 10.1364/OE.381277

Holographic Three-Dimensional Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality Display Based on 4K-Spatial Light Modulators

Author(s):

Gao, Hongyue; Xu, Fan; Liu, Jicheng; Dai, Zehang; Zhou, Wen; Li, Suna; Yu, Yingjie & Zheng, Huadong

Abstract:

“In this paper, we propose a holographic three-dimensional (3D) head-mounted display based on 4K-spatial light modulators (SLMs). This work is to overcome the limitation of stereoscopic 3D virtual reality and augmented reality head-mounted display. We build and compare two systems using 2K and 4K SLMs with pixel pitches 8.1 μm and 3.74 μm, respectively. One is a monocular system for each eye, and the other is a binocular system using two tiled SLMs for two eyes. The viewing angle of the holographic head-mounted 3D display is enlarged from 3.8° to 16.4° by SLM tiling, which demonstrates potential applications of true 3D displays in virtual reality and augmented reality.”

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Publication: Applied Sciences
Issue/Year: Applied Sciences, Volume 9; Number 6; Pages 1182; 2019
DOI: 10.3390/app9061182

Endogenous SHG and 2PEF coherence imaging of substructures in neurons in 3D

Author(s):

Carlos Macias-Romero, Claire Teulon, Marie Didier, and Sylvie Roke

Abstract:

“Neuronal morphology, long-distance transport and signalling critically depend on the organization of microtubules in the cytoskeleton. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging has been recognized as a potentially powerful tool for in situ label-free neuroimaging with specific sensitivity to microtubules. We study here the structural organization of microtubules in living neurons using a wide-field multiphoton microscope that performs 3D imaging using a structured illumination. This microscope allows label-free high throughput imaging of living mammalian neurons. We show that we can image structural correlations by taking advantage of the structured illumination and the coherence of the emitted light. The result allows us to study the microtubule organization throughout the development of the neuron and to differentiate between the regions of the cytoskeleton in the matured neuron.”

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Publication: Optics Express
Issue/Year: Vol. 27, Issue 3, pp. 2235-2247 (2019)
DOI: 10.1364/OE.27.002235

Raman imaging through multimode sapphire fiber

Author(s):

Sunan Deng, Damien Loterie, Georgia Konstantinou, Demetri Psaltis, and Christophe Moser
Abstract:

“We report on a sapphire fiber Raman imaging probe’s use for challenging applications where access is severely restricted. Small-dimension Raman probes have been developed previously for various clinical applications because they show great capability for diagnosing disease states in bodily fluids, cells, and tissues. However, applications of these sub-millimeter diameter Raman probes were constrained by two factors: first, it is difficult to incorporate filters and focusing optics at such small scale; second, the weak Raman signal is often obscured by strong background noise from the fiber probe material, especially the most commonly used silica, which has a strong broad background noise in low wavenumbers (<500-1700 cm−1). Here, we demonstrate the thinnest-known imaging Raman probe with a 60 μm diameter Sapphire multimode fiber in which both excitation and signal collection pass through. This probe takes advantage of the low fluorescence and narrow Raman peaks of Sapphire, its inherent high temperature and corrosion resistance, and large numerical aperture (NA). Raman images of Polystyrene beads, carbon nanotubes, and CaSO4 agglomerations are obtained with a spatial resolution of 1 μm and a field of view of 30 μm. Our imaging results show that single polystyrene bead (~15 µm diameter) can be differentiated from a mixture with CaSO4 agglomerations, which has a close Raman shift.”

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Publication: Optics Express
Issue/Year: Vol. 27, Issue 2, pp. 1090-1098 (2019)
DOI: 10.1364/OE.27.001090

Deep speckle correlation: a deep learning approach toward scalable imaging through scattering media

Author(s):

Yunzhe Li and Yujia Xue and Lei Tian

Abstract:

“Imaging through scattering is an important yet challenging problem. Tremendous progress has been made by exploiting the deterministic input–output “transmission matrix” for a fixed medium. However, this “one-to-one” mapping is highly susceptible to speckle decorrelations – small perturbations to the scattering medium lead to model errors and severe degradation of the imaging performance. Our goal here is to develop a new framework that is highly scalable to both medium perturbations and measurement requirement. To do so, we propose a statistical “one-to-all” deep learning (DL) technique that encapsulates a wide range of statistical variations for the model to be resilient to speckle decorrelations. Specifically, we develop a convolutional neural network (CNN) that is able to learn the statistical information contained in the speckle intensity patterns captured on a set of diffusers having the same macroscopic parameter. We then show for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that the trained CNN is able to generalize and make high-quality object predictions through an entirely different set of diffusers of the same class. Our work paves the way to a highly scalable DL approach for imaging through scattering media.”

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Publication: Optica
Issue/Year: Optica Volume 5, Issue 10 pp. 1181-1190 (2018)
DOI: 10.1364/OPTICA.5.001181

Single-shot memory-effect video

Author(s):

Xiaohan Li and Andrew Stevens and Joel A. Greenberg and Michael E. Gehm

Abstract:

“Imaging through opaque scattering media is critically important in applications ranging from biological and astronomical imaging to metrology and security. While the random process of scattering in turbid media produces scattered light that appears uninformative to the human eye, a wealth of information is contained in the signal and can be recovered using computational post-processing techniques. Recent studies have shown that statistical correlations present in the scattered light, known as ‘memory effects’, allow for diffraction-limited imaging through opaque media without detailed knowledge of (or access to) the source or scatterer. However, previous methods require that the object and/or scatterer be static during the measurement. We overcome this limitation by combining traditional memory effect imaging with coded-aperture-based computational imaging techniques, which enables us to realize for the first time single-shot video of arbitrary dynamic scenes through dynamic, opaque media. This has important implications for a wide range of real-world imaging scenarios.”

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Publication: Scientific Reports
Issue/Year: Scientific Reports 8, Article number: 13402 (2018)
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-31697-8

Multiple-plane image formation by Walsh zone plates

Author(s):

Federico Machado, Vicente Ferrando, Fernando Giménez, Walter D. Furlan, and Juan A. Monsoriu

Abstract:

“A radial Walsh filter is a phase binary diffractive optical element characterized by a set of concentric rings that take the phase values 0 or π, corresponding to the values + 1 or −1 of a given radial Walsh function. Therefore, a Walsh filter can be re-interpreted as an aperiodic multifocal zone plate, capable to produce images of multiple planes simultaneously in a single output plane of an image forming system. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate for the first time the focusing capabilities of these structures. Additionally, we report the first achievement of images of multiple-plane objects in a single image plane with these aperiodic diffractive lenses.”

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Publication: Optics Express
Issue/Year: Optics Express Volume 26, Issue 16
DOI: 10.1364/OE.26.021210

Lensless Stokes holography with the Hanbury Brown-Twiss approach

Author(s):

Darshika Singh and Rakesh Kumar Singh

Abstract:

“The recording and reconstruction of the Stokes parameter is of paramount importance for the description of the vectorial interference of light. Polarization holography provides a complete vectorial wavefront, however, direct recording and reconstruction of the hologram is not possible in a situation where the object is located behind the random scattering layer. The Stokes holography plays an important role in such situations and makes use of the Fourier transform relation between the Stokes parameters (SPs) at the scattering plane and the generalized Stokes parameters (GSPs) of the random field. In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate the Stokes holography with the Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) interferometer. We also propose and implement a lensless Fourier configuration for the Stokes holography. This permits us to reconstruct the wavefront from the GSPs at any arbitrary distance from the scattering plane. The application of the proposed technique is experimentally demonstrated for the 3D imaging of two different objects lying behind the random scattering medium. Depth information of the 3D objects is obtained by digitally propagating the generalized Stokes parameters to a different longitudinal distance. The quality of the reconstruction is assessed by measuring the overall visibility, efficiency, and PSNR of the reconstruction parameters.”

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Publication: Optics Express
Issue/Year: Optics Express, Vol. 26, Issue 8, pp. 10801-10812 (2018)
DOI: 10.1364/OE.26.010801

Lateral position correction in ptychography using the gradient of intensity patterns

Author(s):

Priya Dwivedi and Sander Konijnenberg and Silvania Pereira and Paul Urbach

Abstract:

“Ptychography, a form of Coherent Diffractive Imaging, is used with short wavelengths (e.g. X-rays, electron beams) to achieve high-resolution image reconstructions. One of the limiting factors for the reconstruction quality is the accurate knowledge of the illumination probe positions. Recently, many advances have been made to relax the requirement for the probe positions accuracy. Here, we analyse and demonstrate a straightforward approach that can be used to correct the probe positions with sub-pixel accuracy. Simulations and experimental results with visible light are presented in this work.”

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Publication: Ultramicroscopy
Issue/Year: Ultramicroscopy, Volume 192, September 2018, Pages 29-36
DOI: 10.1016/j.ultramic.2018.04.004

Non-iterative method for phase retrieval and coherence characterization by focus variation using a fixed star-shaped mask

Author(s):

A. P. Konijnenberg and Xingyuan Lu and Leixin Liu and W. M. J. Coene and Chengliang Zhao and H. P. Urbach

Abstract:

“A novel non-iterative phase retrieval method is proposed and demonstrated with a proof-of-principle experiment. The method uses a fixed specially designed mask and through-focus intensity measurements. It is demonstrated that this method is robust to spatial partial coherence in the illumination, making it suitable for coherent diffractive imaging using spatially partially coherent light, as well as for coherence characterization.”

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Publication: Optics Express
Issue/Year: Optics Express, Vol. 26, Issue 7, pp. 9332- 9343 (2018)
DOI: 10.1364/OE.26.009332