Optical see-through holographic near-eye-display with eyebox steering and depth of field control

Author(s):
Jae-Hyeung Park and Seong-Bok Kim

Abstract:

“We propose an optical see-through holographic near-eye-display that can control the depth of field of individual virtual three-dimensional image and replicate the eyebox with dynamic steering. For optical see-through capability and eyebox duplication, a holographic optical element is used as an optical combiner where it functions as multiplexed tilted concave mirrors forming multiple copies of the eyebox. Fo1r depth of field control and eyebox steering, computer generated holograms of three-dimensional objects are synthesized with different ranges of angular spectrum. In optical experiment, it has been confirmed that the proposed system can present always-focused images with large depth of field and three-dimensional images at different distances with shallow depth of field at the same time without any time-multiplexing.”

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Publication: Optics Express

Issue/Year/DOI: Optics Express Volume 26, Issue 21
DOI: 10.1364/oe.26.027076

Compact design for optical-see-through holographic displays employing holographic optical elements

Author(s):

Pengcheng Zhou and Yan Li and Shuxin Liu and Yikai Su

Abstract:

“Holographic AR display is a promising technology for head-mounted display
devices. However, it usually has a complicated optical system and a large form factor, preventing it from widespread applications. In this work, we propose a flat-panel design to produce a compact holographic AR display, wh
ere traditional optical elements are replaced by two holographic optical elements (HOEs). Here, these two thin HOEs together perform the optical functions of a beam expander, an ocular lens, and an optical combiner. Without any bulky traditional optics, our design could achieve a compact form factor that is similar to a
pair of glasses. We also implemented a proof-of-concept prototype to verify its feasibility. Being compact, lightweight and free from accommodation-conve
rgence discrepancy, our design is promising for fatigue-free AR displays.”

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Publication: Optics Express

Issue/Year/DOI: Optics Express Volume 26, Issue 18
DOI: 10.1364/OE.26.022866

Holographic near-eye display system based on double-convergence light Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm

Author(s):

Peng Sun and Shengqian Chang and Siqi Liu and Xiao Tao and Chang Wang and Zhenrong Zheng

Abstract:

“In this paper, a method is proposed to implement noises reduced three-dimensional (3D) holographic near-eye display by phase-only computer-generated hologram (CGH). The CGH is calculated from a double-convergence light Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm, in which the phases of two virtual convergence lights are introduced into GS algorithm simultaneously. The first phase of convergence light is a replacement of random phase as the iterative initial value and the second phase of convergence light will modulate the phase distribution calculated by GS algorithm. Both simulations and experiments are carried out to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. The results indicate that this method can effectively reduce the noises in the reconstruction. Field of view (FOV) of the reconstructed image reaches 40 degrees and experimental light path in the 4-f system is shortened. As for 3D experiments, the results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can present 3D images with 180cm zooming range and continuous depth cues. This method may provide a promising solution in future 3D augmented reality (AR) realization.”

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Publication: Optics Express

Issue/Year/DOI: Optics Express, Vol. 26, Issue 8, pp. 10140- 10151 (2018)
DOI: 10.1364/OE.26.010140

Near-eye light field holographic rendering with spherical waves for wide field of view interactive 3D computer graphics

Author(s):

Liang Shi and Fu-Chung Huang and Ward Lopes and Wojciech Matusik and David Luebke

Abstract:

“Holograms display a 3D image in high resolution and allow viewers to focus freely as if looking through a virtual window, yet computer generated holography (CGH) hasn’t delivered the same visual quality under plane wave illumination and due to heavy computational cost. Light field displays have been popular due to their capability to provide continuous focus cues. However, light field displays must trade off between spatial and angular resolution, and do not model diffraction.

We present a light field-based CGH rendering pipeline allowing for reproduction of high-definition 3D scenes with continuous depth and support of intra-pupil view-dependent occlusion. Our rendering accurately accounts for diffraction and supports various types of reference illuminations for hologram. We avoid under- and over-sampling and geometric clipping effects seen in previous work. We also demonstrate an implementation of light field rendering plus the Fresnel diffraction integral based CGH calculation which is orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art [Zhang et al. 2015], achieving interactive volumetric 3D graphics.

To verify our computational results, we build a see-through, near-eye, color CGH display prototype which enables co-modulation of both amplitude and phase. We show that our rendering accurately models the spherical illumination introduced by the eye piece and produces the desired 3D imagery at the designated depth. We also analyze aliasing, theoretical resolution limits, depth of field, and other design trade-offs for near-eye CGH.”

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Publication: {ACM} Transactions on Graphics

Issue/Year/DOI: ACM Transactions on Graphics, Vol. 36, No. 6, Article 236. (November 2017)
DOI: 10.1145/3130800.3130832

Holographic near-eye displays for virtual and augmented reality

Author(s):

Maimone, Andrew and Georgiou, Andreas and Kollin, Joel S

Abstract:
“We present novel designs for virtual and augmented reality near-eye displays based on phase-only holographic projection. Our approach is built on the principles of Fresnel holography and double phase amplitude encoding with additional hardware, phase correction factors, and spatial light modulator encodings to achieve full color, high contrast and low noise holograms with high resolution and true per-pixel focal control. We provide a GPU-accelerated implementation of all holographic computation that integrates with the standard graphics pipeline and enables real-time (≥90 Hz) calculation directly or through eye tracked approximations. A unified focus, aberration correction, and vision correction model, along with a user calibration process, accounts for any optical defects between the light source and retina. We use this optical correction ability not only to x minor aberrations but to enable truly compact, eyeglasses-like displays with wide elds of view (80◦) that would be inaccessible through conventional means. All functionality is evaluated across a series of hardware prototypes; we discuss remaining challenges to incorporate all features into a single device.”

Link to Publications Page

Publication: ACM Transactions on Graphics (TOG)

Issue/Year/DOI: ACM Transactions on Graphics, Vol. 36, No. 4, Article 85. (July 2017)
DOI: 10.1145/3072959.3073624