Particle trapping and conveying using an optical Archimedes’ screw

Author(s):

Barak Hadad and Sahar Froim and Harel Nagar and Tamir Admon and Yaniv Eliezer and Yael Roichman and Alon Bahabad

Abstract:

“Trapping and manipulation of particles using laser beams has become an important tool in diverse fields of research. In recent years, particular interest has been devoted to the problem of conveying optically trapped particles over extended distances either downstream or upstream of the direction of photon momentum flow. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate an optical analog of the famous Archimedes’ screw where the rotation of a helical-intensity beam is transferred to the axial motion of optically trapped micrometer-scale, airborne, carbon-based particles. With this optical screw, particles were easily conveyed with controlled velocity and direction, upstream or downstream of the optical flow, over a distance of half a centimeter. Our results offer a very simple optical conveyor that could be adapted to a wide range of optical trapping scenarios.”

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Publication: Optica

Issue/Year/DOI: Optica Vol. 5, Issue 5, pp. 551-556 (2018)

DOI: 10.1364/OPTICA.5.000551

 

Observing the cell in its native state: Imaging subcellular dynamics in multicellular organisms

Author(s):

Liu, Tsung-Li and Upadhyayula, Srigokul and Milkie, Daniel E. and Singh, Ved and Wang, Kai and Swinburne, Ian A. and Mosaliganti, Kishore R. and Collins, Zach M. and Hiscock, Tom W. and Shea, Jamien and Kohrman, Abraham Q. and Medwig, Taylor N. and Dambournet, Daphne and Forster, Ryan and Cunniff, Brian and Ruan, Yuan and Yashiro, Hanako and Scholpp, Steffen and Meyerowitz, Elliot M. and Hockemeyer, Dirk and Drubin, David G. and Martin, Benjamin L. and Matus, David Q. and Koyama, Minoru and Megason, Sean G. and Kirchhausen, Tom and Betzig, Eric

Abstract:

“True physiological imaging of subcellular dynamics requires studying cells within their parent organisms, where all the environmental cues that drive gene expression, and hence the phenotypes that we actually observe, are present. A complete understanding also requires volumetric imaging of the cell and its surroundings at high spatiotemporal resolution, without inducing undue stress on either. We combined lattice light-sheet microscopy with adaptive optics to achieve, across large multicellular volumes, noninvasive aberration-free imaging of subcellular processes, including endocytosis, organelle remodeling during mitosis, and the migration of axons, immune cells, and metastatic cancer cells in vivo. The technology reveals the phenotypic diversity within cells across different organisms and developmental stages and may offer insights into how cells harness their intrinsic variability to adapt to different physiological environments.”

 

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Publication: Science

Issue/Year/DOI: Science, Vol. 360, Issue 6386, (2018)
DOI: 10.1126/science.aaq1392

Investigation of albumin-derived perfluorocarbon-based capsules by holographic optical trapping

Author(s):

Jannis Köhler and Jegor Ruschke and Katja Bettina Ferenz and Cemal Esen and Michael Kirsch and Andreas Ostendorf

Abstract:

“Albumin-derived perfluorocarbon-based capsules are promising as artificial oxygen carriers with high solubility. However, these capsules have to be studied further to allow initial human clinical tests. The aim of this paper is to provide and characterize a holographic optical tweezer to enable contactless trapping and moving of individual capsules in an environment that mimics physiological (in vivo) conditions most effectively in order to learn more about the artificial oxygen carrier behavior in blood plasma without recourse to animal experiments. Therefore, the motion behavior of capsules in a ring shaped or vortex beam is analyzed and optimized on account of determination of the optical forces in radial and axial direction. In addition, due to the customization and generation of dynamic phase holograms, the optical tweezer is used for first investigations on the aggregation behavior of the capsules and a statistical evaluation of the bonding in dependency of different capsule sizes is performed. The results show that the optical tweezer is sufficient for studying individual perfluorocarbon-based capsules and provide information about the interaction of these capsules for future use as artificial oxygen carriers.”

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Publication: Biomed. Opt. Express

Issue/Year/DOI: Biomedical Optics Express Vol. 9,Issue 2, pp. 743-754(2018)

DOI: 10.1364/BOE.9.000743

 

Near-eye light field holographic rendering with spherical waves for wide field of view interactive 3D computer graphics

Author(s):

Liang Shi and Fu-Chung Huang and Ward Lopes and Wojciech Matusik and David Luebke

Abstract:

“Holograms display a 3D image in high resolution and allow viewers to focus freely as if looking through a virtual window, yet computer generated holography (CGH) hasn’t delivered the same visual quality under plane wave illumination and due to heavy computational cost. Light field displays have been popular due to their capability to provide continuous focus cues. However, light field displays must trade off between spatial and angular resolution, and do not model diffraction.

We present a light field-based CGH rendering pipeline allowing for reproduction of high-definition 3D scenes with continuous depth and support of intra-pupil view-dependent occlusion. Our rendering accurately accounts for diffraction and supports various types of reference illuminations for hologram. We avoid under- and over-sampling and geometric clipping effects seen in previous work. We also demonstrate an implementation of light field rendering plus the Fresnel diffraction integral based CGH calculation which is orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art [Zhang et al. 2015], achieving interactive volumetric 3D graphics.

To verify our computational results, we build a see-through, near-eye, color CGH display prototype which enables co-modulation of both amplitude and phase. We show that our rendering accurately models the spherical illumination introduced by the eye piece and produces the desired 3D imagery at the designated depth. We also analyze aliasing, theoretical resolution limits, depth of field, and other design trade-offs for near-eye CGH.”

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Publication: {ACM} Transactions on Graphics

Issue/Year/DOI: ACM Transactions on Graphics, Vol. 36, No. 6, Article 236. (November 2017)
DOI: 10.1145/3130800.3130832

Single-shot measurement of the orbital-angular-momentum spectrum of light.

Author(s):

Kulkarni, Girish and Sahu, Rishabh and Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S. and Boyd, Robert W. and Jha, Anand K.

Abstract:

“The existing methods for measuring the orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) spectrum suffer from issues such as poor efficiency, strict interferometric stability requirements, and too much loss. Furthermore, most techniques inevitably discard part of the field and measure only a post-selected portion of the true spectrum. Here, we propose and demonstrate an interferometric technique for measuring the true OAM spectrum of optical fields in a single-shot manner. Our technique directly encodes the OAM-spectrum information in the azimuthal intensity profile of the output interferogram. In the absence of noise, the spectrum can be fully decoded using a single acquisition of the output interferogram, and, in the presence of noise, acquisition of two suitable interferograms is sufficient for the purpose. As an important application of our technique, we demonstrate measurements of the angular Schmidt spectrum of the entangled photons produced by parametric down-conversion and report a broad spectrum with the angular Schmidt number 82.1.”

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Publication: Nature Communications

Issue/Year/DOI: Nature Communicationsvolume 8, Article number: 1054 (2017)
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-01215-x

Superresolution far-field imaging of complex objects using reduced superoscillating ripples

Author(s):

Xiao Han Dong and Alex M. H. Wong and Minseok Kim and George V. Eleftheriades

Abstract:

“Superoscillation is a phenomenon where a wave oscillates locally faster than its highest Fourier component. While previous reports have shown attractive possibilities for a superoscillation-based far-field superresolution imaging device, it has also been recognized that a high-energy “sideband” region coexists with the superresolution features. This sideband causes strong restrictions and necessitates trade-offs in achievable resolution, viewing area, and sensitivity of the imaging device. In this work, we introduce a new class of superoscillation waveform—which consists of a diffraction-limited hotspot surrounded by low-energy superoscillating sidelobe ripples. This waveform alleviates the aforementioned trade-off and enables superresolution imaging for complex objects over a larger viewing area while maintaining a practical level of sensitivity. Using this waveform as the point spread function of an imaging system, we demonstrate the successful superresolution of Latin letters without performing scanning and/or post-processing operations.”

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Publication: Optica

Issue/Year/DOI: Optica, Vol. 4, Issue 9, pp. 1126-1133 (2017)
DOI: 10.1364/OPTICA.4.001126

Programmable Vector Mode Multiplexer

Author(s): N. K. Fontaine and H. Chen and R. Ryf and D. Neilson and J. C. Alvarado and J. van Weerdenburg and R. Amezcua-Correa and C. Okonkwo and J. Carpenter

Abstract:

“We demonstrate a programmable vector mode multiplexer using a low-loss spatial light phase modulator that can multiplex 10 modes. It is reconfigured to generate modes for multi-mode fiber and modes with arbitrary polarization including linear, radial, and azimuthal.”

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Publication: 2017 European Conference on Optical Communication (ECOC)

Issue/Year/DOI: 2017 European Conference on Optical Communication (ECOC)
DOI: 10.1109/ECOC.2017.8346099

Holographic near-eye displays for virtual and augmented reality

Author(s):

Maimone, Andrew and Georgiou, Andreas and Kollin, Joel S

Abstract:
“We present novel designs for virtual and augmented reality near-eye displays based on phase-only holographic projection. Our approach is built on the principles of Fresnel holography and double phase amplitude encoding with additional hardware, phase correction factors, and spatial light modulator encodings to achieve full color, high contrast and low noise holograms with high resolution and true per-pixel focal control. We provide a GPU-accelerated implementation of all holographic computation that integrates with the standard graphics pipeline and enables real-time (≥90 Hz) calculation directly or through eye tracked approximations. A unified focus, aberration correction, and vision correction model, along with a user calibration process, accounts for any optical defects between the light source and retina. We use this optical correction ability not only to x minor aberrations but to enable truly compact, eyeglasses-like displays with wide elds of view (80◦) that would be inaccessible through conventional means. All functionality is evaluated across a series of hardware prototypes; we discuss remaining challenges to incorporate all features into a single device.”

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Publication: ACM Transactions on Graphics (TOG)

Issue/Year/DOI: ACM Transactions on Graphics, Vol. 36, No. 4, Article 85. (July 2017)
DOI: 10.1145/3072959.3073624

Coherent optical adaptive technique improves the spatial resolution of STED microscopy in thick samples

Author(s):

Wei Yan and Yanlong Yang and Yu Tan and Xun Chen and Yang Li and Junle Qu and Tong Ye

Abstract:

“Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy is one of far-field optical microscopy techniques that can provide sub-diffraction spatial resolution. The spatial resolution of the STED microscopy is determined by the specially engineered beam profile of the depletion beam and its power. However, the beam profile of the depletion beam may be distorted due to aberrations of optical systems and inhomogeneity of a specimen’s optical properties, resulting in a compromised spatial resolution. The situation gets deteriorated when thick samples are imaged. In the worst case, the severe distortion of the depletion beam profile may cause complete loss of the super-resolution effect no matter how much depletion power is applied to specimens. Previously several adaptive optics approaches have been explored to compensate aberrations of systems and specimens. However, it is difficult to correct the complicated high-order optical aberrations of specimens. In this report, we demonstrate that the complicated distorted wavefront from a thick phantom sample can be measured by using the coherent optical adaptive technique. The full correction can effectively maintain and improve spatial resolution in imaging thick samples.”

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Publication: Photonics Research

Issue/Year/DOI: Photonics Research, Vol. 5, Issue3, pp. 176-181 (2017)
DOI: 10.1364/PRJ.5.000176

Linearly polarized vector modes: enabling MIMO-free mode-division multiplexing

Author(s):

Lixian Wang, Reza Mirzaei Nejad, Alessandro Corsi, Jiachuan Lin, Younès Messaddeq, Leslie Rusch, and Sophie LaRochelle

Abstract:

“We experimentally investigate mode-division multiplexing in an elliptical ring core fiber (ERCF) that supports linearly polarized vector modes (LPV). Characterization show that the ERCF exhibits good polarization maintaining properties over eight LPV modes with effective index difference larger than 1 × 10−4. The ERCF further displays stable mode power and polarization extinction ratio when subjected to external perturbations. Crosstalk between the LPV modes, after propagating through 0.9 km ERCF, is below −14 dB. By using six LPV modes as independent data channels, we achieved the transmission of 32 Gbaud QPSK over 0.9 km ERCF without any multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) or polarization-division multiplexing (PDM) signal processing.”

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Publication:Optics Express

Issue/Year/DOI: Optics Express Vol. 25, Issue 10, pp. 11736-11749 (2017)

DOI: 10.1364/OE.25.011736