Wavefront correction of spatial light modulators using an optical vortex image

Author(s): A. Jesacher, A. Schwaighofer, S. Fürhapter, C. Maurer, S. Bernet, and M. Ritsch-Marte

Abstract:

“We present a fast and flexible non-interferometric method for the correction of small surface deviations on spatial light modulators, based on the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. The surface distortion information is extracted from the shape of a single optical vortex, which is created by the light modulator. The method can be implemented in optical tweezers systems for an optimization of trapping fields, or in an imaging system for an optimization of the point-spread-function of the entire image path.”

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Publication:Optics Express
Issue/Year: Optics Express, Vol. 15, Issue 9, pp. 5801-5808
DOI: 10.1364/OE.15.005801

Femtosecond pulse shaping using a two-dimensional liquid-crystal spatial light modulator

Author(s): E. Frumker and Y. Silberberg

Abstract:

“We introduce a programmable, high-rate scanning femtosecond pulse shaper based on a two-dimensional liquid crystal on a silicon spatial light modulator (SLM). While horizontal resolution of 1920 addressable pixels provides superior fidelity for generating complex waveforms, scanning across the vertical dimension (1080 pixels) has been used to facilitate at least 3 orders of magnitude speed increase as compared with typical liquid-crystal SLM-based pulse shapers. An update rate in excess of 100 kHz is demonstrated.”

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Publication: Optics Letters
Issue/Year: Optics Letters, Vol. 32, Issue 11, pp. 1384-1386 (2007)
DOI: 10.1364/OL.32.001384

Digital spatially incoherent Fresnel holography

Author(s): Joseph Rosen and Gary Brooker

Abstract:

“We present a new method for recording digital holograms under incoherent illumination. Light is reflected from a 3D object, propagates through a diffractive optical element (DOE), and is recorded by a digital camera. Three holograms are recorded sequentially, each for a different phase factor of the DOE. The three holograms are superposed in the computer, such that the result is a complex-valued Fresnel hologram. When this hologram is reconstructed in the computer, the 3D properties of the object are revealed.”

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Publication:Optics Letters
Issue/Year: Optics Letters, Vol. 32, Issue 8, pp. 912-914
DOI: 10.1364/OL.32.000912